Jinks

December 1908: Broodmare Hoodoo proves a bonanza

“I hope you will have as good success with this mare as you have had with Hoodoo,” said John B. Ewing to Dr. M. W. Williams, of Williams & Bradford, owners of the Adelbert Stud, Hopkinsville, when Miss Crawford was knocked down to him at the Fasig-Tipton sale last week in Lexington, KY.

“I thank you,” replied Dr. Williams, “but to own another mare her equal as a producer is beyond my expectations. If Miss Crawford brings me one-fourth the returns I have had from Hoodoo I shall be highly gratified. Do you know that Hoodoo cost us only $275, and that she has brought us over $40,000? Yes, sir, she has, and another remarkable thing about her history is that she was mated eleven consecutive seasons with old imported Albert and never missed producing a foal.”

The writer, interested at this statement, asked Dr. Williams further concerning the remarkable daughter of imported Darebin and Miss Clay by Hindoo.

“Hoodoo was bred by J. B. Haggin at Rancho del Paso in California,” said Dr. Williams. “She was foaled in 1889 and was sold as a yearling to Pierre Lorillard. For some reason, possibly because of the fact that she is by Darebin and comes from the family of Miss Woodford, Belle of Runnymeade, Hoodoo’s second dam, being a full sister to the once queen of the turf, she was not trained and was put into the Rancocas Stud and mated with The Sailor Prince as a 2-year-old in 1891. Her first foal was a colt in 1892. I do not know what became of him. In 1893 she had no foal. In 1894 she produced Try Again by The Sailor Prince, and in 1895 Rabbit Foot, by the same horse. These never amounted to anything.

In the winter of 1894-1895 Mr. Lorillard had a weeding out sales of the Rancocas Stud, and I bought Hoodoo for $275. In the spring of 1895 I mated her with imp. Albert, which good horse I had bought for $2,500, virtually a song, a short while before. Hoodoo’s foal from this union was Jinks in 1896. I sold her to Capt. W. H. May for $100, and “Bub” May trained her. In two seasons she started thirty-eight times, won eighteen races and won $8,035, but not all of it for Capt. May. He sold Jinks to Pat Dunne for $3,000. From him she passed to Barney Schreiber, then to Sidney Paget and then to W. C. Whitney, who sent her to England in 1902 and bred her to Donovan. The foal in 1903 was a chestnut colt that died. In 1904 Jinks produced Killaloe, by Kilmarnock, and in the season of 1906 and 1907 she won $12,485 for Harry Payne Whitney, and I believe is now in his Brookdale Stud, in New Jersey, along with Jinks.

Hoodoo’s next foal was Mesmerist, in 1897. I sold him as a yearling to A. Featherstone (they were racing then as Bromley & Co.) for $1,250. He was the champion 2-year-old of 1889, winning the Foam, the Double Event (second half) – had been defeated by John Madden’s Prince of Melbourne for the first half. The Dash, the Autumn, the Great Eastern and the Junior Champion were also won by him. In all, he won nine races, three seconds and one third, and $48,175 for his thirteen starts that year.

Mr. Featherstone, as I remember it, refused an offer of $70,000 for Mesmerist in the winter of 1899, and I refused Mr. Lorillard’s offer of $10,000 for Hoodoo about the same time. Mesmerist was a disappointment in 1900 and 1901, made only nine starts during the two years and did not win.

Mr. Featherstone also bought the next four foals by Albert and Hoodoo, they being Mintage, $6,000; Hatasoo, $5,600; Mesmer, $5,800, and Komombo, $4,500. Mintage never won a race; Hatasoo, speedy and reliable, won nine races and $16,675 for her sixteen starts in two seasons. As a 2-year-old she won the Vernal, and as a 3-year-old the New Rochelle, the Clermont, Coney Island Handicap, Swift, Brighton Oaks and Flying Handicap. She has two foals, Raquel and Effendi, racing this year, and the former is a winner.

Mesmer was a disappointment. He raced two seasons, but did not win. Komombo raced five seasons and won five races, yet she did not earn as much as she cost. The late W. C. Whitney paid me $7,700 for Ranger. He raced four seasons and won only one race. P. J. Dwyer bought Albert F., the next foal, for $3,500. He paid his way. Adelbert Belle was the next. Julius Bauer got her for $2,000. She is a winner and is still racing. Carlton was the next. P. J. Dwyer bought him for $2,500. He made his first start this year as a 3-year-old but has yet to win. Spellbound, the last foal from the union of Albert and Hoodoo, is now a 2-year-old. J. L. McGinnis bought him for $2,000, and he has won four races and $1,710 out of eleven starts.

After Spellbound was foaled I retired old Albert (he is now 27, but healthy and full of life), and mated Hoodoo with Ornus, the sire of Oiseau, and I sold her yearling colt by him this year to Joe S. Hawkins for $1,200. I have a fine weanling colt by the same young horse out of her at home, and she is again in foal to Ornus.”

Dr. Williams’ record of the amounts for which the produce of this remarkable mare were sold shows the total to be $42, 150, as follows:

A perusal of the racing guides produces the following for the turf performances of the eleven sons and daughters of Albert and Hoodoo, showing that they have collectively won forty-eight races and $83,310.

In addition to this there are the winnings of Hoodoo’s granddaughters, Killaloe, $12,485, and Raquel, $515. It is one of the very best producing records to be found in the American Stud Book, and probably stands alone for successive mating with one sire.”
(The Nashville American, 12/12/1908)

Advertisements