Author: Onebytheknows

August 1945: Attune dead heats for 3rd at Garden State Park, becomes sole winner upon foul

“CAMDEN, N. J., Aug. 7 (AP) – A turf rarity occurred in the first race at Garden State Park today when a horse that had finished in a dead heat for third was moved up to be the winner and the other mount figuring in the deadlock officially was placed fourth.

Lilson, ridden by A. Daniels, ran first, a head before Worries. Attune and Counsellor finished in the dead heat, a nose back of Worries. Near the wire Worries, on the inside, bore out and Lilson, on the outside, lunged in, with Attune sandwiched between them.

Nick Wall, on Attune, lodged claims of foul against both Lilson and Worries and the stewards allowed both claims. The stewards said the riders of both Lilson and Worries admitted their mounts had offended, but not intentionally.

The stewards contended Counsellor in no way had figured in the roughing and would have been fourth had there been no trouble. He was moved out of the dead heat for third to be fourth. Attune was placed ahead of Lilson and Worries.

Attune made the pace and might have lasted except for the interference. She was neglected in the betting and paid $28.10 for $2. Worries was the favorite.” (The New York Times, 08/08/1945)

Photo: Round Table evaluates his performances, 1958

Round Table with trainer William Molter and owner Travis Mitchell Kerr. Photo: Time Magazine, 09/08/1958

Chart of the week: Discovery falters under 143 lbs. in the Merchants’ and Citizens’ Handicap, August 1936

The New York Times, 08/09/1936

“Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Aug. 8. – How much thoroughbred muscle and bone can stand is the question to the fore here today as Discovery failed gallantly under 143 pounds in the Merchants’ and Citizens handicap with Middleburg stable’s filly, Esposa, the winner under 100 pounds.

Young Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt sent out his champion son of Display as a sporting gesture to the public even though he believed in New York earlier in the season that the 144 pounds assigned in a handicap was more than any horse should be asked to carry. The biggest crowd of the season, 18,000 saw the race, and cheered Discovery in defeat as much as Esposa in victory.

Discovery was last in a field of five, which ran over a track rough and slow from the rain of the day before yesterday. The combination of weight and track were too much for Discovery, and this is taking nothing from the filly, who did all that was asked, and did it gamely and well.

She finished smartly a length before Count Arthur which was up to take the place by a head from Mantagna. Then came Giant Killer, while Discovery trailed. The mile and three-sixteenths test had a gross value of $11,050, of which $8,500 went to the owner of the winner. Nick Wall had the mount and got the filly home first in 2:00 2-5, very slow time even though Esposa’s was a nice effort.

There have been few racing days this season as satisfying to lovers of the thoroughbred. Despite the popularity of Discovery, and his known prowess as the champion, there were many who had misgivings as to any horse’s ability to carry 143 pounds. Thus the Vanderbilt color-bearer went to the post at 7 to 10, while Esposa was as good as 7 to 1.

Whisk Broom II carried 139 to victory in the Suburban of 1930 and Discovery carried the same impost to be first in last year’s Merchants’ and Citizens. Man o’ War’s top impost was 138 during his racing career. Even Exterminator, mighty cup horse of another day, failed at Latonia over a distance of ground under 140.

In sprint races the weight above 140 can be handled, as Roseben and many other thoroughbreds have shown. But over a distance of ground, poundage beyond 140 takes its toll. The impost today was 140, plus a three-pound penalty for the victory of Discovery at this course on Wednesday. The total of 143 and the track were too much.

The break was even after a brief time at the post and Johnny Bejshak, Discovery’s rider, had to change his mind in the first few seconds. His mount broke smartly, but he did not have his accustomed drive in getting away. For this the lead in the saddle was doubtless to blame.

In any event, instead of having his mount outrun his field to the first turn, as Discovery with such an even break might be expected to do, Bejshak found himself on the outside of four horses as they made the swing for the first turn. Thus he had to change tactics and try to rate behind the pace-setting Mantagna. That fellow stepped away smartly and opened a couple of lengths’ lead.

Most of the riders in most of the races were staying off the rail, and Bejshak took advantage of this when he tried to improve his position in the backstretch. He let the big horse slip down toward the rail, where there was clear sailing and perhaps poorer footing. In any event Discovery began to pick up those in front; by the time the far turn was reached the field had bunched and Discovery was in danger of being in close quarters.

But this never happened. Because Wall gave Esposa the call on the outside she moved up to challenge Mantagna, and Mantagna and Esposa moved away from the others. These events transpired in the run from the far turn to the top of the stretch. As the leaders came to the top of the home lane, it was seen that they were well off the rail and that Discovery had plenty of room to run.

Bejshak had not given up. He cut the corner with Discovery, saved all possible ground, and it was clear that he thought he needed to save ground. Discovery came on only momentarily and then he stopped. He could do no more.

Esposa and Mantagna on the head end had about finished their duel, with the filly the decisive winner. Mantagna tired and could not even withstand Count Arthur, which made his usual late charge and was good enough to be second.” (Bryan Field / The New York Times, 08/09/1936)

1836: Racing for big cotton at Natchez

“A quarter of a million dollars is the most money ever put up for two horses to race for. This sum was wagered at Natchez, Miss., in 1836, Walker Thurston matching his horse Rodolph against Hon. J. F. Claybourne’s mare Susan Yandell for 2,500 bales of cotton aside, it being equal to $250,000. Susan Yandell had a walkover for the money, as Rodolph took sick shortly before the time set for the contest.” (The Daily American (Nashville, TN), 06/14/1890)


Accounting for inflation, $250,000 in 1836 is roughly equivalent to $5,540,000 in 2016.

Susan Yandell would go on to become the sixth dam of the Salvator colt Savable, who landed his own big cotton in winning the $58,400 Futurity Stakes in 1902.

Photo of Savable as published in Outing (Vol. XLII, No. 2), May 1903.

The finish of the 1902 Futurity Stakes, won by Savable by a nose over Lord of the Vale.
Photo as published in Munsey’s Magazine (Vol. XXVIII, No. 2), November 1902.

June 1906: Obituary of Cinderella (GB), dam of Hastings and Plaudit

Cinderella, queen of the stud book, is dead.

The most successful and valuable of thoroughbred broodmares was her glorious reputation.

Made her owner, a struggling physician in a country town, a wealthy capitalist in a few years. She cost $500 and returned to him $150,000. She paid for every inch of 850 acres of blue grass land owned by Dr. J. D. Neet, the now famous Versailles, Ky., breeder and turfman. Her produce run far over $100,000 on the turf and no less than four of her sons now rank among America’s most valuable sires. The most costly monument ever erected in memory of a horse is to mark her grave at Kindergarten Stud.

Here is her stud record … Sold for
1889 – Foreigner … $5,000
1890 – Ferrier … 5,000
1892 – Handsome … 12,500
1893 – Hastings … 37,000
1894 – Chelsea … 5,000
1895 – Plaudit … 25,000
1896 – Glenheim … 15,000
1897 – Dan Reagan … 6,000
1898 – Glass Slipper (running qualities only) … 5,000
1900 – East India (running qualities only) … 5,000
1902 – Migraine … 10,000
1903 – Fairy Prince … 5,000
1904 – Slippers … 5,000

She was barren the first year she was bred, in 1888, and she had no foal in 1891, 1899, 1901, 1905, and 1906. Dr. Neet sent her this season to Elmendorf Stud to be bred to Waterboy. Later he received a message from C. H. Berryman, manager of that establishment, to the effect that the Brighton Handicap winner was impotent. Dr. Neet then ordered her to be bred to Africander, but that horse’s book proved full, and he sent her to Horse Haven Farm, and mated her to Ethelbert, and she was presumed to be in foal to Perry Belmont’s great racer when she died. Cinderella was 21 years old. Early last winter she was in rather poor condition, but she soon recovered her health and was in first-class fix seemingly up to within an hour of her death. She died of heart disease.

Of her famous produce Hastings is the premier sire of A. Belmont’s Nursery Stud, and in 1902 he headed the list of American winning sires; Plaudit is a star in the noted Hamburg Stud by J. E. Madden; Glenhelm is owned by H. S. Oxnard, the multimillionaire Treasurer of the Sugar Trust; Migraine is also at Hamburg Place; Handsome is at the head of Dr. Neet’s Kindergarten Stud; Glass Slipper and East India are broodmares at Kindergarten Stud, and Fairy Prince, now a 3-year-old, and Slippers, a 2-year-old of this season, are both in the racing stable of Harry Payne Whitney. Of her other produce Dan Reagan and Chelsea both were gelded, while Foreigner and Ferrier are dead, the latter dying the property of W. S. Hobart, the San Mateo (Cal.) breeder, who purchased him to place at the head of his stud.

In the thirteen foals she produced Cinderella never dropped but three fillies, and for six straight years she dropped in succession a half dozen stud colts. No matter what she was bred to she produced a sensational horse. Ferrier was by Fonso, Hastings by Spendthrift, Plaudit by Himyar, Handsome and Glenhelm by Hanover, and Migraine by imp. Topgallant.

At 17 years of age the late W. C. Whitney offered Dr. Neet $15,000 for the celebrated mare. Dr. Neet wrote the noted New York turfman that the principal living things he possessed were his wife, daughter and Cinderella, and he could not break up the family. Later on Whitney leased the breeding qualities of the mare for $10,000, and she was sent to his La Belle Stud, being returned to Dr. Neet in the summer of 1904, the breeding contract being canceled at the death of Whitney.

Cinderella was bred by Sir Thomas Throgmorton [sic], of England. In 1886 Alfred Withers, of London, sent to Egmont Lawrence in this country to sell ten broodmares and two yearling fillies. The last named two were Cinderella and Sarantella, the latter herself the dam of ten winners. Both were purchased shortly after their arrival in Lexington by Dr. Neet, he paying $500 for Cinderella and $400 for the dam of Handsel.

Cinderella was broken and handled by John Clay in the training stable of the late Maj. B. G. Thomas, and showed to have much speed in her work. Dr. Neet, however, had bought her for a brood mare and would not permit her to race. As a result she never faced the starter’s flag.

None of her daughters as yet are old enough in the stud to have representatives on the turf. Glass Slipper now has at Kindergarten Stud a suckling bay colt by Don De Oro and East India has at her side a bay colt by Ethelbert. Dr. Neet bred Glass Slipper this season to the latter horse, while he mated East India to imp. Star Shoot. He has ten foals by Cinderella’s son, Handsome, this year.

Cinderella was of double parentage, being sired by Blue Ruin, or Tomahawk, while her dam Hanna was a daughter of Brown Bread. She belongs to the No. 21 family of the Bruce Lowe figure system. What Pocahontas and Queen Mary were in England, Cinderella was in this country, and she has left an impression on racing in America as lasting as time itself.

The monument Dr. Neet will erect to perpetuate her memory will be mounted with a pedestal in bronze, a reproduction of the famous mare in life, taken from the last photograph made of her in her paddock at Kindergarten Farm.” (The Nashville American, 06/12/1906)

Photograph of Plaudit as published and Bit & Spur (Vol. 11, No. 1), February 1912.

Chart (and photo) of the week: 27-horse field at Belmont, August 1945

On August 7, 1945, the fourth race at the wartime Saratoga at Belmont meeting masqueraded as a cavalry charge when twenty-seven colts and geldings took to the starting gate for a 5 ½ furlong maiden event.

The race was won by Top Flight’s cousin Our Bully (Bull Lea), who scored by a half-length over Uncle Mac (Rhodes Scholar (FR)), with Count Fleet’s full brother Count Speed (Reigh Count) next back in third.

The New York Times, 08/08/1945

27-horse maiden race at Belmont Park (08/07/1945), won by Our Bully.
Photo available from historicimages.com (Part number: nes42227).