Chart of the week: Altawood wins the 1924 Pimlico Cup in a blinding snowstorm

The Washington Post, 11/16/1924.


“Running right back to his victory in the Bowie handicap last Tuesday, Altawood, bearing the scarlet and white striped colors of J. E. Widener, the Philadelphia sportsman, was a galloping winner yesterday in the sixth annual renewal of the Pimlico cup, the feature of the closing-day program, which was run off in a snowstorm for the first time in the history of the sport in Maryland.

The Belair stud’s Aga Khan, who was beaten a head by Altawood in the Bowie, finished second to him again yesterday though he was whipped more decisively. The Lilane stable’s Sunsini was third, while the Salubria stable’s My Own, the only other starter, who essayed the 2 ¼ mile journey, was pulled up at the head at the head of the stretch and finished a bad last.

The storm, which began with a drizzling rain in the early morning, became so heavy during the early part of the afternoon that it was impossible to distinguish colors in the backstretch or at the upper turn during the first three races, but it had abated somewhat by post time for the feature event and the subsequent races and the crowd, which was exceptionally large considering the mean weather, had no trouble following the running during the rest of the day.

The rain and snow left the track in a treacherous state of mud and slush, which the favorites for the most part had difficulty in negotiating, though in the races where there was any semblance of class the choices ran through it all right.

The Pimlico cup was run in much the same fashion as the Bowe except that Johnny Maiben allowed Sunsini and My Own to make the pace instead of going to the top with Aga Khan as he did on that occasion, while Ivan Parke, as usual, dropped Altawood in behind his field.

They maintained this order for the first mile and a half with Marinelli steering Sunsini wide all the way in the better going, as he has no particular fondness for mud. At the far turn there was a general closing up and My Own bore out almost to the middle of the track before Babin could straighten him out, while Aga Khan and Altawood moved up on the leader.

Circling the bend it was apparent that Altawood would be the winner as he was running at Aga Khan’s throat latch with Parke still having him under restraint. As they swung into the stretch he bounded away from the Omar Khayam colt without trouble to go on to a three-length victory, without ever being fully extended.

Aga Khan ran his customary honest race, and had no trouble trimming the tiring Sunsini for the place. There was some who contended that if Maiben had not made the pace in the Bowie with him he would have beaten Altawood yesterday’s performance convinced them that he is no match for the son of Master Robert – Crestwood Girl over a distance of ground.

After bearing out on the far turn, My Own ran almost to the outside fence at the head of the stretch and finished next to the rail with Babin easing up. It was at first thought that he had broken down by William Brooks, his trainer, announced that he had pulled up sound. The presence of My Own in the race occasioned no little surprise as his aversion to anything but a hard track is known to all. His trainer was against starting him, but Admiral Cary T. Grayson, owner of the Salubria stable, insisted on it.

“I know he can’t run in the mud, but maybe he can in a snowstorm,” said the Admiral, and My Own was sent to the post.

Altawood paid 1 to 2 in the mutuels and his victory was worth $7,950 to Mr. Widener. Aga Khan earned $2,00 by running second, Sunsini $1,000 and My Own $500. Mr. Widener bought Altawood about a month ago at a reported price of $40,000 and his triumphs in the Bowie and Pimlico cup have already netted him about half that sum. If he continues to go on next year, there is no question but that he will prove a big bargain for the Quaker City sportsman.”
(Harry Stringer / The Washington Post, 11/16/1924)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s