March 1909: Obituary of Sir Dixon

Photo of Sir Dixon as published in Hoofprints of the Century: Excerpts from America’s oldest journal of horse racing and breeding, the Thoroughbred Record, and its predecessor publications, the Livestock Record and Kentucky Live Stock Record, as compiled and annotated by William Robertson (covering 1875-1919 and 1966-1974) and Dan Farley (1920-1965).

“Lexington, Ky., March 24. – Sir Dixon, Colonel E. F. Clay’s famous old thoroughbred stallion, is dead. Sir Dixon, while romping in his paddock at Runnymede stud, near Paris, yesterday afternoon, fell and broke a bone in his right hip. Colonel Clay, seeing that it would be impossible to save the son of Imported Billet and Jaconet, by Imp. Leamington, had him destroyed.

Sir Dixon was bread in the Runnymede stud and was foaled in the spring of 1885, making him 24 years old. As a yearling he was sold to W. S. Barnes, who disposed of him at the same age to Green B. Morris, for whom, as a two-year-old, he won the Camden and Select Stakes and Flatbush Handicap.

Morris took him to Washington the following spring, 1888, and won the Analostan Stakes, then moved on to Brooklyn and won the Carlton Stakes so easily from Raceland, the only other starter, that Dwyer Brothers bought him for a large price. For them he won that year the Withers, the Belmont, the Travers and the Lorillard Stakes. He did not go to the post in 1889. His only victory in 1890 was the defeat of Taragon in the St. James Hotel Stakes at Brooklyn, and his racing career ended with his breakdown in a high weight handicap sweepstakes at Coney Island in June of that year.

Sir Dixon’s winnings for Mr. Morris and the Dwyer Brothers aggregated nearly $50,000, and after his breakdown he was sold to Colonel Clay and Catesby Woodford, for something like $6,000, to become the premier stallion at Runnymede.

The first of Sir Dixon’s get made their appearance in racing in 1894, and the following is a schedule of their winnings:

1894 . . . . . . . . . . . $61,470
1895 . . . . . . . . . . . $25,435
1896 . . . . . . . . . . . $41,208
1897 . . . . . . . . . . . $35,085
1898 . . . . . . . . . . . $83,617
1899 . . . . . . . . . . . $59,499
1900 . . . . . . . . . . . $68,806
1901 . . . . . . . . . . . $206,926
1902 . . . . . . . . . . . $92,092
1903 . . . . . . . . . . . $32,165
1904 . . . . . . . . . . . $75,454
1905 . . . . . . . . . . . $99,905
1906 . . . . . . . . . . . $64,916
1907 . . . . . . . . . . . $68,070
1908 . . . . . . . . . . . $24,392

Making an aggregate of $1,039,040 in 15 years.

The most distinguished performers by Sir Dixon were Alpen, Ahom, Agile, Audience, Blues, Blue Girl, Butterflies, Captain Arnold, Conjurer, Countess Irma, Diminutive, Disobedient, Dr. Bernays, Druid, Donation, Elusive, Femesole, George Arnold, George B. Cox, Hymettus, Jack Point, John Bright, Kernel, Kilmarnock, Martha Gorman, Memories, Mercer, Maceo, Necedah, Nones, Queen Dixon, Orimar, Outcome, Running Water, Six Shooter, Sir Vassar, Sir Dixon Jr., Sweet Dixie, South Breeze, Sir Oliver, Sir Hubert, Surmise, The Conqueror, Thirty-Third, Yankee Girl.

The star winners of these were: Blue Girl, $68,900; Blues, $62,805; Running Water, $52,990; Butterflies, $50,830; Agile, $49,332; Kilmarnock, $46,595.” (Cincinnati Enquirer, 03/25/1909)

Sir Dixon’s champion daughter Blue Girl (1899 ch. f. o/o Bonnie Blue by Hindoo) as a 2-year-old. Photo as published in Management of Breeding of Horses by Merritt Wesley Harper, 1913.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s